Tuesday, November 25, 2014

More thoughts on Fergusson

I was going to do this as a comment on Lady Red's post, but I want to addt a couple of videos. Here are my thoughts:

I wonder if it would be possible to help those business owners rebuild their businesses -- elsewhere. Let Fergusson rot. The business owners tried to be productive members of society so I think we should help them to rebuild what society allowed to be taken away from them.

Those ignoramuses that burned Fergusson down? They can live in the ashes. Don't use a dime of taxpayer funds to help rebuild what they destroyed. In fact, let the professional victims burn down all the blue cities and let them rot. End welfare to them as well.

The entire St. Gentle Giant narrative came apart as each new piece of information came out.  Even black witnesses say he was charging Officer Wilson. Not that is is related, but here is a video that describes the situation very well:



Bill Whittle puts succinctly:



Obama is not a failure. He is a disgrace. He and his race-bating friends are showing gasoline on a pile of dynamite then lighting road flares.

62 comments:

  1. Excellent points and analysis, Matt. I would be on board with federal aid to rebuild those business elsewhere. My first thought when I saw the burnt-out images for the few seconds of coverage I watched was "let it stand".

    As I type the mayor of Ferguson is giving a statement. They are asking why the Nat'l Guard wasn't called out. I heard that Nixon said they would be there tonight but why were they held back last night?

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    1. It's unfathomable why Nixon withheld Guard troops last night. Obama is a pariah...why would Nixon do anything he or Holder asked? Was he intimidated into playing the race hustle game?

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  2. Wow. Whittle nails it.

    Matt, I like the way you think. I'd reach in my pocket to help these business owners relocate and reestablish their livelihoods. And yeah, let the thugs eat the ashes of the stores they looted and burned down. Screw 'em.

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  3. I've posted this a length elsewhere, but short version is this: Detroit, where I live now and did then, had an ugly riot in 1967. Less than a year later Martin Luther King was killed. We expected a riot again...but it did NOT happen. Pray tell me how the death of Michael Brown somehow out weights the death of Martin Luther King as motivation to wreck mayhem on the whole town?

    I think these hustlers like it and since they can't incite one of the blackest cities in the USA they go to the boonies. Heaven forbid they gain the sence of the poorest Detroiter.

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    1. BTW...the feds rebuilt much of New Orleans, but did diddly squat in Detroit. Private entrepreneurs have invested in the city slowly over time and it is re-emerging as I speak. My daughter now lives in the central city's core district...and walks to work in the financial business she works in today.

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    2. Ari, I'm glad to hear about Detroit.

      I wonder what would have happened had GM gone BK. My sense is that they would have been bought by a German or Japanese company (or heck, maybe Hyundai*) and gone on even better. The brands themselves (Chevy, GMC, Cadillac, etc) would have lived - there's a lot of equity in those brands, no sense in killing them. And Detroit would have lived too.

      But we'll never know, because that just wasn't going to happen. I doubt even a Republican administration would have let GM just go BK.

      * You know you've made it as a global brand when an indifferent American can spell "Hyundai" correctly without looking it up.

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    3. Yeah, you can also spell Hyundai correctly if you lived in Korea for a couple years :-) However, enen then you might not know the Hyundai of today is not the Hyundai conglomerate of many years ago...it was broken up in the early 2000's. Today the name is carried on in several separate industries, the automotive group being one of them. Had they remained a conglomerate they'd have been the largest company in the ROK, similar to one of our old monopolies like Standard Oil. I remember them as makers of concrete and construction products, with plants in Inchon.

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  4. Great posts LR and Fay. Chief Flynn is a compelling speaker. Simultaneous eloquence and rage is hard to pull off but he was masterful.

    IMHO whoever was behind the "protesters" was trying to provoke the police and NG into firing on the crowds. Better to let the place burn. Don't play the game.

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    1. And by Fay I meant Matt. :|

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    2. And by Fay I meant Matt

      "We two are one"...Eurythmics

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    3. Lewy...based upon my personal experience in some mob suppression roles while in uniform, I'm fairly confident that the Guardsmen had very few cartridges, if any. My squad was once detailed to assist MP's handling a mob of 5-10,000...and were were issued only 5 rounds each, plus we had bayonets fixed...we joked that 4 were for the mob and one for ourselves. We managed the bluff due to our superb thespian skills, if I may say so myself. :-)

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  5. I'll bet you guys and gals a turkey drumstick that the media and other outside agitators gather up their placards and adjourn to their warm, comfy homes for Thanksgiving, leaving the streets of Ferguson desolate and smoking in the snow.

    Of course, they'll be back on Friday, with full tummies and ready to push for more rioting and looting. Jerks.

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  6. If I was the owner of a looted or burned business in Ferguson, I would not rebuild, there. As Matt said, let them live in the ashes they've made of their "community", with no services and no concern from others about what they've done to themselves.

    The Milwaukee Police chief told nothing but straight truth, and I'm sure will soon be excoriated as a racist for telling it.

    Whittle, of course, always nails it, as does everyone who comments here.

    In any case, I wish all here a Happy Thanksgiving, and offer a prayer that there will be much more to be thankful for in the coming year.

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  7. Thank you Dances. Perhaps we can be thankful that voice are starting to rise above the din.

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  8. Happy Thanksgiving to all my wonderful friends here at the Kitchen Table. We just got back home from my niece's who hosted this year, I think it was one of the best get-togethers ever.

    Now we're watching the Hawks kick some 49er azz. Life is good ;-)

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    1. Ditto what florie said - I hope all my friends here had a happy Thanksgiving.

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    2. Lewy...I had a lovely Thanksgiving, seeing my daughter for dinner, which is rare on TG because she usually visits her mother in the north woods...this year, due to work requirements, she could not go...but we managed a nice dinner at a great Italian Restaurant here, one that serves parties of 10 to 16 with a full course Turkey dinner...plus their regular menu. In that spirit I had a nice 5 course meal including Beef Stefanelli with a side of Veal Picante', plus antipasto, soup, pasta, and desert...canolli of course. ... Turkey is nice, but northern Italian is more my style.

      As for the Ferguson mess, here is something I posted elsewhere on the subject, giving this week's revelations:

      A final comment about the Ferguson hullabaloo …. now that Officer Wilson has resigned. The residents of Ferguson, heck all of St Louis County, should not be surprised in the future when their police officers sort of lag on responses and don’t take actions when otherwise called for by circumstances. I have witnessed this personally in my town in the late 70’s when officers just didn’t give a dang…several officers I knew then took a protect myself stance first and refused to get involved in much policing per se. I witnessed one sergeant I knew fairly well who had gone through a similar episode as Officer Wilson, but did not resign, tell an excited young man, who was reporting a car break in and theft within 100 yards of where we were standing…he told the citizen “welcome to Detroit” … and continued to smoke his cigarette.

      When assaulting a uniformed police officer is considered unworthy of response by said officer, especially if alone, then the overall demeanor of the police force will change out of self preservation instinct.

      Good luck Ferguson. You have just placed yourself back in to the 1970’s.


      Next, I blame much of the media and television news for parts of the problem...e.g., insisting that there is a problem with police types people being on a power trip, which is purportedly why they become police officers. I watched CNN's Candy Crowly interview three black Police Chiefs and Deputy Chiefs from large cites, including Detroit's Chief of Police. Ms Crowley tried very, very, hard to foster the police mentality power trip meme, plus the idea black men or women are not welcome among the police ranks...with no luck. She looked quite frustrated at the end. What did she expect from three high ranking African American police officers, executives no less, with vast experience. I'm guessing Candy Crowley has never walked a beat or patrolled a tough neighborhood ...but sits in her neat little media chair espousing things she has virtually no experience with herself. Pathetic.

      Astualy Al Jeezera had much better discussions on the same topic, without the bias. We either get control of our media and demand they report the news without political and racial bias slants, or we will never solve the problems that remain...which I know from personal experience in a city 85% black are far less than they were 1960-1979.

      Why does progress irritate some people? Why do they deny it?

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    3. For the record, I found the Ferguson episode tragic, but explainable....by the physical evidence available to us up to now. The nonsense that Officer Wilson fired from 35 feet or so away (Dr Badden,the Brown family's hired pathologist) is belied by the placement of the 10 shell casings...all aligned with Brown's body and slightly to the right ... most semi-auto pistols eject to the side and slightly to the rear, no more than 10 feet away,....and I have fired a several thousands rounds myself that bears this out. Casings do not fly forward, ever in my experience. In short the location of the empty casings supports Officer Wilson's version of the event....even that he was back pedaling as he said. Even the two casings found by his vehicle and the damage inside that vehicle is consistent with his story, not to mention the brusing on his head and face. The fact that pundits and witnesses, who have been disproved, claimed otherwise tells the story of whole wants to write a fictional story. 10 witnesses, most black confirmed Officer Wilson's story as well.

      Officer Wilosn did make a huge mistake, one most urban officer know far better than to try...he initially spoke to Brown and his companion from inside his vehicle...that is just not done and is extremely careless. You pull past the persons of interest, stop, get out and face them standing up to give directions...e.g., get out of the middle of the street and on to the sidewalk. Much harder to be surprised by assault that way. However, that mistake does not make Wilson a man who set out that morning to kill a black man...if anything it shows that was not his intent.

      If I can get off my but I will try to read all the 5000 pages of GJ testimony and evidence presented. I suspect it won't change my mind. First error by Brown is confronting a uniformed police officer with violence...doing so they are assaulting the representative of the very community he lives in ... hardly an innocent action.

      In my youth we all learned to not mess with uniformed police officers, back then usually walking a beat alone without a radio (call boxes on lamp poles a block or more away) ... you had to respect the uniform as a representative of your community. If you felt your rights violate thee were and are multiple venues to address that...without bunring down half a town.

      Times have changed, I presume, and nowyou can just run amok as you feel to do.

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    4. Thanks aridog, your comments taught me a lot.

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    5. I hope everyone had a wonderful Thanksgiving!

      Aridog, thank you for the analysis. I read your comments twice. I guess police officers will be forced to wear cameras to record their every encounter and action, just to protect themselves and keep the media from rewriting events. It's a sad state of affairs, for sure.

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  9. Yes, me too. I hadn't thought about him staying in the cruiser instead of getting out first to confront them.

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    1. At least one officer has been shot and killed in Detroit doing this kind of in-car stop. IIRC he had stopped to ask a person on the street where he was going at 3:00 AM with a brown paper bag in his hand....since no stores were open in the area. The gun was in the bag and fired through the bag killing the officer where he sat behind the wheel.

      A similar tactic of using a bag was used in the killing of Federal Protective Service officer Ron Sheffield, both a friend and neighbor of mine, in the lobby of the federal building where I worked on 21 September 2001.

      It is fairly common to carry a weapon in a paper bag here...unfortunately.

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  10. Here is an article that plainly explains what is known to date. It is a WSJ article, so may not be readable to non-subscribers, however I did try to use the Google citation, not the direct citation on the WSJ website...which sometimes works to get past the pay wall.

    If you can read it, note the scattering of the ejected shells near Brown's body...all to the right side and within 10 feet of the body. That is consistent with Wilson's testimony, regarding the proximity of Brown to Wilson, including his remark that he was "backpedaling" at the time.

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    1. My comment disappeared again, damn. OK, I'll keep it short. That was an interesting point about the shell casing pattern and the conclusions you drew from that, Aridog. You might want to know that the attorney's for Officer Wilson were interviewed by Greta this evening and one of them said the exact same thing. He also said that this evidence showed without a doubt the approximate distance between them and the movements made.

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  11. Ari, I'll echo lr and flo - thanks for the analysis.

    Bottom line for me is that

    a) there are times when cops do indeed run amok (see e.g. the fine video which Matt posted (much) earlier this year - black dude gets shot by trigger happy cop)

    b) this is not one of those times.

    So the simple narratives: "cops are racist murderers" and "criminals have it coming, law abiders obey officer Friendly and all will be well" are both very flawed.

    Is it just me, or are others feeling this as well?

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    1. The thing most folks miss is the assault on a uniformed police officer. Period. The uniform and the badge, however acquired, means they represent all of us, or all of them in a given situation. They are representatives of your community...if you are under represented, then look to your voters....and wonder why fewer of your kind try to be police officers. Never mind the qualifications, many off color. Once you learn that, and adopt it as your own philosophy, then the problems go away. Rosa Parks, though violating local laws, did NOT assault the officers who arrested her. None-the-less, she made a giant impact by being non-violent. I've liven in Detroit and witnessed first hand the differences....and have been stopped by black Detroit officers for "driving while white" ...not exactly violating my first amendment rights, but understandable...and I did not assault them.

      There really are very good reasons why Detroit did NOT erupt in violence over this Ferguson bull roar. We are long past the motivation to act crazy... my kid lives in the city core, and walks about without fear. She walks to work, no less, and won't move away for any amount of money.

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    2. Related to your question, I have figured that if I am ever questioned by police, expect as a witness, I won't talk without an attorney. The way people can be prosecuted if law enforcement does not like the way you ask a question, then I want all the help I can get.

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    3. Lewy...my experience is not the same...if I understand you correctly. I am a KISS advocate..and in this case I advocate for Officer Wilson. It is the uniform that makes the difference, period. I'm old as Jurassic dirt but I get it...I respect the uniform and badge, period...maybe that is a left over from my time in the military. What ever it is, I am of the opinion that you never ever challenge a uniformed police officer...they really are your community's representatives, and to challenge them is to disrespect your community.

      I never forget the potential nonsense if we act otherwise.

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  12. RadioMatt.... you do not need an attorney when questioned by police, so long as you tell the verifiable truth. If your are in a situation that requires factual clarification, then by all means, get an attorney.

    In one instance long long ago, I had to advise my daughter, a minor at the time, to tell the truth, when she was arrested for a felony. She did. And she got a suspended sentence and civic service for her punishment. In the end it was a fair verdict.

    One thing that made it work for Kim and I was the promise we made at her age of 11-12 or so...to never lie to each other, no matter what. That night with an ugly felony pending she carried out what we had promised each other.

    To this day we are very close friends above and beyond our legal relationship, in fact in spite of it.

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    1. With all of the prosecutions for obstruction of justice for making mistakes during questioning, I would not trust the government. As I have said many times, if someone wants to put you in jail, then there is a way that they can do it.

      I'm not talking about lying, I am talking about being mistaken. If I happened to be a witness to the Michael Brown shooting and my testimony backed up Officer Wilson, I could almost guarantee you that Eric Holder would find some pretext for putting me in jail.

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    2. Ari, Matt, I tried to write something coherent but - likely because my wife and I have been binge-watching Sons of Anarchy on Netflix in a desperate attempt to catch up from the beginning - I'm probably not in the right frame of mind to comment intelligently on law enforcement. Not right this second.

      And I mean that in a sincere and lighthearted way. :D

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    3. RadioMatt....you are citing distrust toward government per se...and I agree with that. However, the uniformed officers in every community do NOT work for Eric Holder. At the community level you do have a say, at election time, and the local Executives can hold the police accountable. The men and women who wear a uniform and badge represent us, for better or worse...break that down and you have Ferguson,MO.

      That said, I do agree that Eric Holder and his kind can unjustly jail people...their power is far greater than a local cop's. They have no qualms about a form of double jeopardy when they bring civil rights charges against individual officers subsequent to their acquittal or non-indictment. However, day to day, respect the uniform and badge and you will have far less trouble and far better policing. Chances are Eric Holder will have no grounds, even tenuous, for interfering.

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    4. Ari, I understand what you are saying. I just can't help but feel that once you step in a pile of dog s**t, it is on your shoe and it isn't very easy to get it off. I would prefer to not step in it in the first place. I don't think my requesting an attorney would put an insurmountable monkey wrench into an investigation, but it could save me down the road.

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    5. RadioMatt....I'd agree with you if the potential charges are serious or vague or both....then you need a lawyer up front. It's a judgment call in each case, depending upon the situation. Generally, merely being asked to stop doing something by a uniformed officer does not rise to that level, if you stop doing what ever it was that initiated the request.

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    6. Oh, I am not talking about that type of situation. If I were told to stop doing something by an officer, I would definitely stop doing whatever it was I was doing.

      What I am talking about is being questioned as part of an investigation. The government has shown that people who make even honest mistakes in answering questions are subject to prosecution. That is what I want to head off at the pass. That, or some other prosecution of convenience.

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  13. Well tonight we have a new fandango...this time in NYC. Nearly all the video mediums I've watched today, from Fox News (national and local), CNN, Al Jeezera, and local NBC and CBS seem to have serious doubts about the non-indictment of Officer Garner. That's a combination is relative agreement that is rare. I've watched the video that is available several times and I, too, question the procedures used and reason for them...but I've not seen what lead up to it. In my town no one would be even questioned about selling loose cigarettes, let alone arrested. Hell, you just get a ticket, and go on your way, for small amounts of mother nature. I'd think the police have better things to occupy their time. But, I repeat, I have not seen or heard testimony about what lead up to the confrontation. Never the less, Al Sharpton is promptly in the middle of the mix, claiming racism as usual...just like he was here in 2000 when a man was restrained by store security guards and died under similar circumstances (very over weight and died of suffocation and heart failure)...within 24 hours ole Al was asserting racism, never mind both the deceased and the guard were black. Old Al never changes his shtick. Ever.

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    1. Scaramouche, Scaramouche, will you do the Fandango?

      -- Queen, Bohemian Rhapsody

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    2. Thunderbolt and lightning, very, very frightening me!

      -- Wayne, Wayne's World

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    3. Well played, florinista. Well played.

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  14. As soon as we saw Sharpton, we quit watching. There is a special place in hell for that evil demagogue.

    I remember seeing the video of the incident shortly after it happened. I don't think there is ANY comparison to Ferguson. The man who was choked was clearly saying, time after time, "I can't breathe!". I think the person who put on the choke hold should be charged in his death. The news reports say that he has a record of 31 felonies. So what? He was selling cigarettes, not robbing or assaulting somebody. However, I don't believe for a minute it had anything at all to do with race. I LOATHE the people making it into a race issue. I loathe them for how they are making me feel about all of it.

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    1. "Twitter is blowing up".

      Most of the people I follow out of professional necessity have strong SJW tendencies.

      And for once I think they're right about this one.

      But not about race (necessarily; for all I know the cops were double-secret Aryan Brothers or whatnot). But about the cops pretty much having lost the plot when it comes to "keeping the peace".

      Ari, if only I believed that elected officials had control of the cops anymore, I'd agree with you 100%.

      But there are places where I don't think they (and by extension, We the People) do have control over uniformed officers anymore. And that's a problem.

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    2. SJW -> Social Justice Warrior.

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    3. After listening to the news on multiple outlets from Fox to Al Jeezera, I reached a new conclusion..we do NOT have all the information. Until we do, if we ever do, we really can't make a judgment call...in the NYC case. The fact the operation was supervised by a black police sergeant was conveniently left out of most television coverage (virtually all...I had to read it elsewhere)...and belies the "racist" meme.

      If anything I blame the idiots who made it a law that selling cigarettes by the piece a crime...the "tax" argument is spurious. Unless the seller is extorting the people on the street...WTF? BTW...selling "singles" is also illegal in Michigan, but nearly every ghetto liquor store does it (they're on the counter in a big coffee cup) and it seems our police have better things to do than make a fuss.

      Finally I repeat, if I said it earlier here, that I do NOT like the "soft" uniform worn by some of the NYC officers...tee shirts, shorts, and a badge you cannot read from over 2 feet away is nonsense...no one is fooled and it serves no positive purpose...while a cop in uniform with a badge does suppress bad behavior by the mere presence in my experience.

      After De Blasio ran off at the mouth, I guarantee you, 101%, that cops in NYC, all 35,000+ of them, will lay back and be less diligent in enforcing anything but the most serious of situations. I'd do that myself if I was one of them. I've seen it happen where I live between 1975 & 1985 when we had a cop hating mayor.

      Cop: "Uh, where'd you say the problem was?"

      Complainant: "South on 2nd street." "Oh, sorry, my beat only runs north, have a nice day."

      Cop: continues to smoke his cigarette or eat his donut...etc.

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    4. I think they will slack off too and I can't say that I blame them, being thrown under the bus like this with few media on their "side" - or even giving any coverage to the other side of the story.

      I have a theory about these protesters. Yes, there are the usual union people, communists, race baiters and anarchists. But I think a LARGE portion of these protesters are basically uninformed 20- and 30-somethings who have been looking for their "cause". We have the same bunch here in Olympia but all they've had to protest is the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and that just doesn't seem to float their boats. But they can really sink their teeth into the anti-cop thing, it's their Vietnam, their 60's and 70's cause celebre. They have everything else, the anarchist ideology, the filthy hippy street 'look', the dope, the sex...they just needed the right cause.

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    5. It's a fine line we walk. We must support our local cops, or mayhem will ensue. We can't let our local cops become thugs themselves for the same reason.

      I've watched the video repeatedly. It angers me that so many resources were squandered to take down a guy selling untaxed cigarettes. Really? WTF? It appalls me to see Officer Muscles lay a choke hold on the guy. What for? There were plenty of cops there to subdue him.

      I suspect that cigarette guy died because he was obese, with all that entails, and his system couldn't handle the BP overload created by Officer Muscles locking his arm against the carotid artery. Another point: if ciggie guy was stating repeatedly that he couldn't breathe....he could. He would be unable to make sound unless air was passing over the vocal chords.

      Quite frankly, I'm sick to death of all the racial crap. Let blacks patrol their own neighborhoods.

      Or better yet: how about busing rioting blacks to elite liberal white neighborhoods, and let 'em burn the bitch down. *eviiilll cackle*

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    6. What I'd pay to watch from a bunker would be a community with a large mixed population here and no police what-so-ever. Now THAT would be enlightening...for the community that is...raw anarchy is so much fun, eh.

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  15. It's a fine line we walk. We must support our local cops, or mayhem will ensue. We can't let our local cops become thugs themselves for the same reason.
    I think that's it in a nutshell, lady red.


    Quite frankly, I'm sick to death of all the racial crap. Let blacks patrol their own neighborhoods.

    Or better yet: how about busing rioting blacks to elite liberal white neighborhoods, and let 'em burn the bitch down. *eviiilll cackle*

    What I'd pay to watch from a bunker would be a community with a large mixed population here and no police what-so-ever. Now THAT would be enlightening...for the community that is...raw anarchy is so much fun, eh.


    Hear, hear. If only.



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    1. I read a comment that asked why a black who worked hard to be a good police officer and a good member of society would want to be relegated to patrolling terrible neighbourhoods and terrible people strictly because of his skin color. In other words, white get to patrol the peaceful areas of town while the blacks have to patrol gangbangerland.

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    2. Matt...not here, the patrols are mixed everywhere...and in a city 85+% black that means they all get the pleasure, so to speak. In one national television interview our Detroit police chief was on the panel with other black chiefs...and he did NOT rise to racist baiting tried by the interviewer....Candy Crowley IIRC. Beyond that, my little enclave, surrounded by Detroit literally, has an Arab-American police chief, a former Deputy Chief from Detroit....and hands down Dearborn has the best police department that I know of anywhere. Given that my little burg was a claimed home of the KKK not so long ago it is real progress. Being surrounded by poor sections of Detroit, we are part of that scenario as well, and both departments work together....and responsively no less. Just last week a man in the Hispanic part of Detroit, when I attend church, murdered his wife with a hammer and fled to Dearborn with a gun to make a stand...both Detroit and Dearborn responded immediately, about 20 cars (no SWAT teams), and the killer was shot dead in 2 shots by a Detroit officer when he tried to pull his gun....coincidently with Judi in the middle of the block cordoned off. We have had no disturbances because if it. Not a peep.

      Of course, this is not "news" and few if any nationally will see or read about it.

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    3. The suggestion has been made that only blacks should patrol black neighbourhoods. I don't think it is a good idea, nor does anyone whose IQ is higher than his shoe size. I'm just passing on what people have suggested.

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    4. Matt, what I meant to convey with my snarky comment is that the rioters could elect police officers from among their own ranks, and see how they like their neighborhood then. I never intended to slight the many outstanding black police officers that put their lives on the line every day to protect us all. Sorry I was unclear.

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    5. I don't think Matt meant you, lady red!

      I read his comments as a response to the liberals who are offended by having a majority of white officers in a majority black neighborhood. Of course, we all know that if blacks want to apply for those positions there is absolutely nothing stopping them. In fact, they will probably have a BETTER chance of being hired than a white applicant thanks to affirmative action and quotas.

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    6. img:"http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y117/floranista/emoticons/unsure.gif"

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    7. I'm pretty sure he wasn't referring to your comment lady red. He's at work right now and then we are straight out to friends for dinner this evening. I'll get him to confirm tomorrow!

      We luvs ya lady red xxx

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    8. Aww, luvs ya too Fay! I didn't want Matt to think I was a total nincompoop. :))

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  16. One more reason for the police not to protect these jerks:

    Denver high school students protesting recent civilian deaths involving police chanted "Hit him again!" after a car struck four bicycle officers - injuring one critically - Wednesday night, the city's police union charged.

    Officer John Adsit underwent six hours of surgery Thursday for injuries sustained in the accident and was in critical, but stable condition. But the reaction of young students, reported by the Denver Post, left residents stunned and members of the Denver Police Protection Association angry. Students were heard chanting and cheering after the officers were hit. Teachers looked on and did not intervene while the students chanted, Fox31 Denver reports.

    “The Denver Police Protective Association has learned that immediately after the horrible accident yesterday injuring four Denver Police Officers, several parties in the protesting group cheered and chanted “hit him again.” These actions are not only reprehensible but quite possibly the most disturbing thing this Association has ever heard,” a statement released by the police officers’ union Thursday night said.

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  17. Stupid punk kids with not a single moral teaching at any phase of their lives. Disgusting

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